The Friends documentary was enjoyable to watch and very informative.  I never knew how much went into making each episode.  I learned that the process for each single episode is very extensive and there are many different people and departments that go into them.  How the stage department must build each set and then change them for each episode in-between filming sounded like one of the more difficult parts because they are on a very tight schedule and must do everything quickly, so filming can begin.  That being said, after watching the documentary I think every part of making an episode is difficult and that when making friends everyone worked very hard and put forth an amazing episode.  It was crazy to hear that some of them would have to work until six in the morning sometimes just so they could make the episodes on time and make them as great as they were.  One part of the process that I never thought of were the Foley artists.  I think that growing up now I know almost everything is done with CGI or just a sounding board and the sound effects that they already have.  I never really thought that someone had to originally make those sounds and often they would have to get very creative when they did this.  Also, being someone who has never attended a live studio performance I never thought about how the directors, and everyone would get involved in-between shootings of episodes and they would work on jokes and sometimes change them on the fly.  Its pretty wild for me to now know this was the process for just one episode and I think it really shows in how well Friends did, because people love this show.  I love this show and I didn’t even start watching it while they were still filming episodes, same with my sister and she is only thirteen, proving that this show was worth all the effort because it has been timeless.  The members of the show that I believe are most overlooked by the viewers are the members who must move the set in-between each scene because I never even thought about what they do.  I do not think that this role is as important now with many shows not having a live studio audience for filming but in this documentary, it showed me how important they used to be.

I have to agree with Betancourt, in some ways.  I do agree that the “old-fashioned approach to comedy belies the show’s “complex storylines”.  This is because the show has a lot going on and I do also agree that they are eager to tackle socially relevant issues, but I think they are a little too eager to tackle to many different issues at once.  I do however think they are definitely tackling some well by using the daughter well as an activist who helps the mom.  They also do well at having some very serious moments that really make you feel with the characters and it helps to make it easier to put yourself in their shoes and think about some of these issues in their own lives.  Also the way they use humor is not all bad because it can be a nice relief when someone makes a joke after a serious moment to help ease some of the tension and also help everyone feel good again.

Betancourt talks about community and how One Day at a Time does a decent job at this.  He mentions that when the grandma is first introduced into the show and the audience gives her a very loud cheer and she cannot even talk for a little while the audience cheers her.  This is because the audience knows that actor and character, so they like to see her again and they feel as if they are close the actress.  He also talks about how these multi camera shows speak to people individually.  I think though these shows have started to fall out of favor with audiences because people are starting to like the CGI and more action sequences that come with movies and TV shows today.  I think this shows representation of the family is pretty progressive in some ways with how it focuses on a mainly female Cuban cast and family.  Also, how they are always talking about controversial relevant topics and providing solutions to them all in the show.

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